National Findings

National Findings

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• Overall, White, Asian and non-poor high school students have higher access to all three domains of educational opportunity: Access to Quality Educators, Access to College and Career Readiness Curriculum, and Access to Positive School Climate.
• Black, Hispanic, and poor students have less access to quality educators and access to positive school climate. Black and poor students have less access to college and career readiness curriculum, though Hispanic high school students have similar access to college and career readiness curriculum as White students.
• High school students of all races in low-poverty schools have greater access to all three domains of access to educational opportunity.
• Black and Hispanic high school students are concentrated in high-poverty schools, while White students are concentrated in low-poverty schools.
• The concentration of Black and Hispanic students in high-poverty schools appears to be a primary factor driving gaps in access to educational opportunity between Black and White and Hispanic and White students. However, gaps by race/ethnicity exist across all levels of school poverty (i.e. within low-, mid-, and high-poverty schools). For example:

• White students have greater access to quality educators than any other race/ethnic group at all levels of school poverty.
• Gaps in access to college and career readiness curriculum exist between Black and White and Hispanic and White students in low-poverty schools, but Black and Hispanic students have either similar or greater access than White students in mid- and high-poverty schools. Asian students have the greatest access across all levels of school poverty.
• Gaps in access to positive school climate exist between Black and White students in schools of all poverty levels. Notable disparities between Hispanic and White students are not present in mid- and low-poverty schools but a gap that favors Hispanic students is present in high-poverty schools. Asian students have the greatest access across all levels of school poverty.

 

 

 

Support for the Educational Opportunity Dashboard was provided by The Heinz Endowments and the William Penn Foundation. The contents of this Dashboard were developed by RFA and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funders. Many members of the RFA team contributed to this project, including: Jason Fontana, Anna Shaw-Amoah, Dae Kim, David Lapp, Samantha Slade, and Kate Shaw. Special thanks to Anna Shaw-Amoah who led development of the Dashboard and to Jason Fontana who led RFA’s data analysis.